Taylorism and the Doctor’s Office

From this vantage, distant point in my life, childhood meetings with doctors, whether at home–they still made house calls–or whether in the doctor’s clinic, appear as encounters with quasi-avuncular figures, benevolent, mostly-solicitous contacts with a wise, ostensibly caring person. I experienced my share of childhood illnesses, suffered from minor ailments, and almost always looked forward to meeting the doctors who treated me. Consultations took place in their office; preliminary wait in a reception, and then entry into the sanctum sanctorum; I sat on a stool next to the doctor’s desk; the doctor was nearby, walked around to his desk to examine me, and sometimes for more extended examination, moved me to an adjoining recliner. While the waits in the office were sometimes onerous, once told the doctor would see you, you got just that – a ‘meeting’ with the doctor. The doctor’s consultation space seemed made for healing.

The times, they’re a changin’.

To visit a doctor now is to experience a cold, unrelenting blast of Taylorist air, a journey through a land dotted with toll-collectors, each aspiring to rapid and efficient quota completion. You make an appointment and wait in the reception like you always did.  Then you are brusquely asked for your insurance forms, and made to fill out–just like at every other doctor’s office that you’ve been to before–a pile of horribly photocopied forms that ask for details on your medical history, whether you’ve understood your privacy rights, and a host of other legally required disclaimers. Then you wait again. When called in, you don’t meet the doctor. Rather, you are ushered into a small consultancy room, cold and bare, while an assistant screens you by conducting a preliminary examination. (You might have to wait a bit before the assistant shows up.) This preliminary examination over, you are left alone again, sometimes clad in a paper gown.

Then, the doctor–whose voice and form can be dimly discerned as he rushes about in the corridors outside–shows up; clearly in a whirl and a tizzy combined, he is brusque, efficient, and keeping an eye on the clock and his production schedule, his throughput. He reads the pre-examination form quickly, asks a few rapid questions–more often than not, not listening too closely to the stream of information a patient can provide on his body, his ailment–dispenses a quick, snap judgment, and leaves. A battery of tests is ordered; pharmaceutical prescriptions written; and you are told that the ‘assistant’ and the ‘receptionist’ will tie up loose ends. You change, head out the door, are reminded by the receptionist that the co-payment is due, and then, it’s all over. You emerge, blinking, into the sunlight, feeling not so much healed, but as if you had been trussed up, placed on an assembly belt, and had several pounds of flesh withdrawn – by the insurance company, by the doctor’s clinic.

The doctors maximize movement through their clinics; the tests ensure expensive bills can be sent in for insurance claims; the prolific prescriptions pad pharmaceutical profit accounts. The patient, meanwhile, many of his questions unanswered, his possible inputs to the diagnostic process ignored, returns home, disquieted by the experience, disillusioned by the wonders of face-to-face contact with a fellow human being, and supposedly a healer at that.

4 comments on “Taylorism and the Doctor’s Office

  1. Personally, I don’t like visiting the doctor. I’m not really sure why. I have a feeling it has something to do with my childhood that triggered my fear for doctors. I remember being taken to the <a href="http://www.doctorsexpresswilmingtonde.com/"urgent care in wilmington de because my nose started bleeding. I was so scared at first, up to the point that I’d rather loose blood bleeding than go to the doctor. Good thing that I was able to overcome this fear as time passed by.

  2. Lea Michell says:

    I actually like doctors maybe because pacific walk in clinic had been very friendly and accommodating to us. Ever since I was a kid, my doctor was just like my second mom. We could even have lunch out after a check up.

  3. […] run by insurance companies and all too often, populated by doctors who seemingly aspire to ever greater heights of corporate efficiency even as they resolutely neglect their bedside manners and care little about outcomes while ordering […]

  4. […] an older post titled Taylorism and the Doctor’s Office I had complained about the slavish devotion to efficiency and throughput maximization visible in […]

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