Hot, Bothered, and Devout: The Religious Policing of Sex

Yesterday, I posted a review essay on a pair of books by SN Balagangadhara and Rajiv Malhotra that critique the field of “Indian studies.” In my essay I attempted to place into some context the recent controversy over the recall from circulation of Wendy Doniger‘s book, The Hindus: An Alternative History.

Amongst the many charges leveled at Doniger’s writing is that she has “hurt” the sensibilities of devout Hindus. This accusation is often made against many modern scholars of Hinduism; Balagangadhara and Malhotra are part of this chorus. Thus, in my essay I noted the former’s critique of Jeffrey Kripal and Paul Courtright‘s  psychoanalytical takes on the mysticism of Ramakrishna Paramahansa and the legend of Ganesha and his conclusion that Kripal and Courtright were “indulging in mischief” and doing “violence” to “the experiential world of the Hindus.” Malhotra, of course, has been vigorously accusing Doniger of a variety of sins: her treatment of sexuality and sexual themes is one of them.

So, rather unsurprisingly, a centerpiece of these critiques is the offense caused to religious sensibilities by that which is supposed remain between the sheets.

I think we are entitled to be suspicious that whenever Hindus—in India, or elsewhere— or other devout folks–all over the world–get offended by academic or cultural responses to their religion, it invariably has something to do with sex, the one business that gets everyone hot and bothered under their cassocks and lungis. Reading Balagangadhara’s language of “violence” against Hindus, one would imagine the darkest depths of anti-Hindu sentiment had been plumbed. Rather disappointingly instead, it turns out Hindus are like religious prudes everywhere: sex and their gods or their saints do not go together; they are chaste, virtuous, asexual creatures. What a letdown for the civilization that gave us Khajuraho.

By saying this, I do not mean to diminish the ascetic strains in Hinduism—like those pointed to, ironically enough, by Wendy Doniger—but rather to combat the impulses present in the responses to the scholarship of Kripal and Courtright that seek to cover up the erotic and sexual strains in Indian culture at large. Such stereotypical and clichéd outraged responses are, after all, not even in accord with Indian cultural mores. Risqué versions of tales taken from the Ramayana and the Mahabharata often make the rounds in India; there are too, among the young ‘uns, dirty ditties galore about its characters to be sung out loudly and coarsely. Those who sing them, and tell lewd jokes by the dozen about characters from the great Hindu epics, don’t seem to be hurt by their activities.

Balagangadhara and Malhotra owe us an explanation of why so many Indians do not seem perennially offended by such practices. Could it be the vaunted Hindu tolerance and syncretism—spoken so glowingly of by Malhotra—is found here in the implicit understanding that powerful cultural and mythological imaginaries are unlikely to be diminished by a few academic theses? Intolerant reactions do not sit well with the picture these two worthies paint for us of an endlessly patient and resilient tradition.

Unsurprisingly, Balagangadhara and Malhotra, and their fellow “outraged”, claim to speak for too many, and seek to control discourse. Some things never change. For all the exalted theistic conceptions that the supposedly devout seek to foist on us, they descend all too quickly from the sublime to the sordid, from lofty metaphysical conceptions to just good old scoldings about dirty talk. There is nothing new in this outrage; just a tired old policing of sex.

3 comments on “Hot, Bothered, and Devout: The Religious Policing of Sex

  1. ashokbhatia says:

    We can not wish away Khajuraho and Kaamsutra, in any case!

  2. Mudit Chauhan says:

    I’m not entirely sure that we should assume that many Hindus are not outraged by sexual interpretations because they see it as a perfectly acceptable interpretation of Hinduism. In fact, I would argue that most Hindus are simply unaware of such scholarship, and hence the seemingly limited outrage. These works, though well-regarded in academic circles, rarely touch the common man. Which brings me to one significant problem with Doniger and her students’ work – that their interpretation of Hinduism seems to completely disregard the way in which Hindus view their religion and practice it in everyday life. (I am, of course, not advocating a ban on their work. But I can see why practicing Hindus who read these works would feel outraged.)

  3. AJtron the Splendiferous and Invincible says:

    > Balagangadhara and Malhotra owe us an explanation of why so many Indians do not
    > seem perennially offended by such practices. Could it be the vaunted Hindu tolerance
    > and syncretism—spoken so glowingly of by Malhotra—is found here in the implicit
    > understanding that powerful cultural and mythological imaginaries are unlikely to be
    > diminished by a few academic theses?
    I think you have hit the nail on the head. It is also that Hindus are not a “religion obsessed” people. They are just pretty chilled out about religion.

    In fact, the best part about Hinduism is that you don’t have to subject yourself to religious “thought control”. To many of the Hindus I knew growing up, subjecting your knowledge of the universe, of sex, of sexuality, of “how to pray”, et cetera, to the diktat of a bound book, no matter how praiseworthy its literary qualities (Bible or Dianetics or any other form of science/religious fiction), is a very odd notion. But then I grew up in very exclusive circles.🙂

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